Human Rights Commission report shows little progress for women in the workplace

The Human Rights commission’s latest report paints a less-than-rosy picture on how women are tracking in the workplace.

This year the report is in interactive form and covers the current state of play of employment, pay gaps, leadership and discrimination/harassment.

In terms of leadership, the report states that for women “representation at the top table is either progressing at a snail’s pace (in the case of women in the top three tiers of the public service or on boards listed on the stock exchange) or stalled (in the case of public sector boards) or slid backwards (in the case of women in senior management in the private sector),” as is evident in the graphs below.

GENDER BALANCE OF PRIVATE SECTOR BOARDS:

Private Sector

GENDER BALANCE OF STATE SECTOR BOARDS:

State Sector Boards 020715

 

SENIOR MANAGEMENT IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR:

Senior Management 0207015

Other highlights include the fact that young Maori and Pacific women are the most vulnerable in terms of unemployment, as are disabled people.

Pay gap-wise, pay differences continue between men and women, between ethnic groups and between people with and without disabilities in both the broader labour market and the public service.

The interactive tool can be accessed here – the web-tool makes it possible to track the persistence of inequality over time, and whether or not progress towards equality is being made.

YWCA EQUAL PAY AWARDS

The report comes out as the YWCA Equal Pay Awards opens for entries. Launched last year, the awards recognise best practice among business leaders who are on the journey toward equal pay – and shine a spotlight on the gap between men and women’s remuneration in the workplace.

At the heart of The Awards programme is a thought leadership programme, where examples of best practice can be presented as part of the solution, with tried and tested paths for others to follow. Corporates and SMEs are invited to share their equal pay stories, promoting the benefits and inspiring a much needed groundswell of change. Those wishing to enter must demonstrate their initiatives, processes, cultural intent and commitment to addressing equal pay within their organisation.