This week: NZ ranked #36 globally for women

Stay up to date with the latest developments in the world of inclusivity and diversity in NZ and beyond with our curated round up of the week’s news.

 

New Zealand ranked 36th for women’s rights

2 MARCH 2019

In the World Bank’s 2019 ‘Women, Business and the Law’ report, New Zealand was ranked number 36 globally, let down by categories including ‘getting paid’ and ‘having children’. Although the report highlighted that NZ has introduced ‘shared’ parental leave in the last decade, in reality we don’t yet have leave that can be flexibly shared between two parents.

Instead of shared parental leave, New Zealand gives paid leave to the ‘primary carer’. This could be the birth mother, or one adoptive parent, mātua whāngai, grandparent or other whānau, and so on. Payments can be ‘transferred’ to the spouse, but the process is not set up, by default, to encourage shared leave. Instead, the primary eligibility for paid parental leave lies with the birth mum.

 

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It’s time to end the secrecy over unequal pay
Opinion: Saunoamaali’i Dr Karanina Sumeo

8 MARCH 2019

Pay secrecy has allowed women to be underpaid for 45 years … It reinforces racial biases and often hides structural inequalities. If we want to ensure women are not being discriminated against when it comes to their salary, wages and progression, then the Government needs to include pay transparency in legislation.

 

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Vodafone NZ inspires domestic violence policy in 25 countries

8 MARCH 2019

Vodafone Group announced it will be implementing a new programme for victims of domestic violence and abuse in 25 countries, based on a policy developed by Vodafone New Zealand in 2017. Employees globally will now have access to support and specialist counselling, as well as up to 10 days additional paid leave in all markets.

Vodafone CEO Jason Paris says employees have accessed the NZ programme 8 times since it was launched, and is proud that this important support system has been shared with Vodafone employees around the world.

 

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Men, as well as women, discriminated against for having children

8 MARCH 2019

Under New Zealand’s legal system, employers aren’t allowed to discriminate based on family status, age, sex, race, religion, disability, marital status or political opinions. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen.

Of the 13 per cent who said they’ve been asked about their family status, 22 per cent believed answering the question truthfully impacted their chance of securing the job. Similarly, 10 per cent of men who admitted to being asked about their family also believed it had a strong impact on their success.

 

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Can pay transparency reduce the gender pay gap?

8 MARCH 2019

A study into the salary transparency regulations in Denmark found a seven per cent drop in pay disparities when companies had to reveal wages by gender. Researchers said the drop had more to do with a reduction in pay rises for men than an increase in pay rises for women.

 

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Barbie releases a Maori doll… kind of

7 MARCH 2019

Barbie has released its first ever Maori doll, modelled after New Zealand sports journalist Melodie Robinson. The doll, which has “curly hair and beautiful brown skin”, holds a microphone as part of her job as a journalist. Ms Robinson is among 20 women that have had Barbie dolls made in their image as part of an International Women’s Day campaign.

The only problem? The doll isn’t actually available on sale.

 

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Prominent Kiwi wāhine explain what International Women’s Day means to them

8 MARCH 2019

Today marks International Women’s Day, with this year’s globally-recognised event calling for a gender-balanced world and accelerating gender parity. The day has been recognised worldwide for more than a century, but has gained momentum following the emergence of the #MeToo movement. Stuff asked several prominent Kiwi women what this day means to them – in their own words.

 

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